Thursday, December 26, 2013

Making a Re-entry Card for Dummy's Long Suit

The score is 24 to 0 against the dealer on the rubber game. The dealer, Z, makes it no-trump and A leads for the first trick.
  A 2
J 10
Q J 9 5 4 3 2
Q 7
 
K J 4
A 4
A 8 6
10 8 6 5 4
    Y    10 9 7 5
Q 9 6 3
10 7
9 3 2
A   B
    Z   
  Q 8 6 3
K 8 7 5 2
K
A K J
 
TRICKAYB Z
1 5   7   9   A  
2   6   2   7   K
3 4   Q   2   J  
4   A   Q   10 2  
5 6   10   3   K  
6   4   A   5   3
7   8   J 3   5  
8 4     9   7 7  
9   J   5   9   6
10 8     4   10   8
11 10     3 6     Q
12 A   J   Q   K
13   K   2 9   8  
 

The dealer wins ten tricks with the following notes:

Trick 1.—A opens his fourth best heart, as his hand is strong, and he wishes his partner to return that suit.
The Dealer.—As the longest suit in the two hands is diamonds, the dealer takes the first trick with the A of hearts, so that he may be able, if necessary, to put the dummy hand in the lead; also so that the adversaries may not know the cards he holds in the heart suit.
Trick 2.—A refuses to part with the commanding card of the diamond suit.
Trick 3.—The dealer takes the lead in the dummy hand in order to establish his diamond suit.
Trick 4.—As the dealer has now no diamonds, it is useless to hold up any longer.
Trick 6.—If A leads either clubs or spades he must lose a trick; his best play is to continue with the heart suit.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Playing for the Longest Suit in the Two Hands

The score is love-all, rubber game. The dealer, Z, makes it no-trump and A leads for the first trick.


8 6 4
7 6 5 2
A 6 3
9 5 4
K J 10 2
9 8
Q J 7 5 4
6 3
  Y  Q 7 5
K Q 3
K 8 2
K J 8 7
A   B
  Z 
A 9 3
A J 10 4
10 9
A Q 10 2
TRICKAYB Z
1 5 3 K 9
2 J   6 8   10
3 4   A   2   3
4 8 2   Q   A  
5 9 5   K   J  
6 3 9   7   2  
7 6   4   8 10  
8 2 6   3   10  
9 10 7     5 4  
10 7 5   J   Q  
11 Q   4 K   A  
12   J   6   7   A
13   K   8   Q   9
 
The dealer wins nine tricks.
Trick 1.—A leads from his longest suit.
Trick 2.—B returns his partner's lead with his highest card, which the dealer refuses to take, as he wishes to wait until B has no more of the suit.
Trick 3.—A again leads a diamond, as he has the K of spades for re-entry and wishes to establish the diamond suit.
Trick 4.—The dealer plays for the clubs, his longest suit, and takes the first trick, as he holds J and 10 and can clear the suit in one more lead.
Trick 6.—B, having no diamonds, opens his heart suit, hoping to put his partner in the lead. The dealer applying the "Rule of Eleven," and finding that he holds the four cards above the seven, passes so as to take the lead in the dummy hand.
Trick 7.—Leading through.
Tricks 8 and 9.—Making the clubs and putting the dummy hand in the lead so as to come through the K and J of hearts.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Keeping the Command of the Adversaries' Suit

The score is love-all, rubber game. The dealer, Z, makes it no-trump. A leads for the first trick. The underlined card wins the trick and the card under it is the one led for the next trick.
9
K Q J 5 4 2
Q 6 5
7 6 3
K Q J 8 6 2
9 8
9 4
10 8 2
  Y  10 7 5
A 7
J 10 8 7
A J 9 5
A   B
  Z 
A 4 3
10 6 3
A K 3 2
K Q 4
TRICKAYB Z
1 K 9 5 3
2 Q 3 7   4
3 2   2 6     10
4 8 2   7   10  
5 9 J   A   6  
6 2 7   5   K  
7 6 4   9 9  
8 8 5   J   4  
9 J Q     7 Q  
10 4 K     8   2
11 9   Q   10   3
12 8   6   J   K
13 10   5 A     A
 
The dealer wins ten tricks.



Sunday, December 1, 2013

Combining the Hands of Dealer and Dummy

The following table gives the different combinations of cards and shows how they should be played to get the best results when the dealer holds one combination and the dummy holds the other. An "x" means one or more small cards.

The following combinations may be led from either hand:

In One Hand.In the Other.
A K x Q x x
A Q x K x x
K Q x J x x
K J x Q x x
K x x Q J x
Q J x 10 x x
Q 10 x J x x
Q x x J 10 x

If forced to lead from any of the following combinations, lead from the weaker of the two hands. In these, lead the highest card of the three in the weak hand:

In One
Hand.
In the
Other.
 
x x xK Q xFirst trick, play queen.
x x xK J xFirst trick, play jack.
x x xK x xFirst trick, play king.
J x xK x xFirst trick, play low.

In the following, lead from the weaker hand, but begin by playing the lowest card:

In One
Hand.
In the
Other.
 
Q x xA x xFirst trick, play ace.
J x xA x xFirst trick, play ace.
Q x xK x xFirst trick, play king.
J x xQ x xFirst trick, play queen.

These rules are based on the supposition that the second hand has not played a higher card than any in the hand to which you lead.
There is a difference of one or two tricks in all these combinations, depending on whether you or your adversaries open the suit. Try to get the adversaries to open such suits for you, as you do so yourself to a disadvantage. Throw the lead into their hands and make them lead to you.